Out & About …

… on the North York Moors, or wherever I happen to be.

Tag: Captain James Cook

  • With a teachers’ strike likely, it seems timely to point out that exactly 50 years ago today teachers resumed their normal working after a three-month work-to-rule dispute with the local authority

    With a teachers’ strike likely, it seems timely to point out that exactly 50 years ago today teachers resumed their normal working after a three-month work-to-rule dispute with the local authority

    On this day in 1973, the Daily Mirror published interviews with some Teesside pupils: HILARY COX, age 13: “It’s rotten, it’s boring, and my Mam says she’s sick of me going in and out like a yo-yo all day. There’s nothing to do at all. “I’ve been going to all the classes that have been […]

  • The story of Cleopatra’s Needle’s journey to Britain

    The story of Cleopatra’s Needle’s journey to Britain

    The well-known monument to Capt. James Cook was erected in 1827. The design of an obelisk has led some to speculate a masonic connection. But the more probable reasoning was that obelisks were simply in vogue. In that year, Dublin had begun its erection of the Wellington Monument in Phoenix Park to commemorate victories by […]

  • With the cloud hiding most signs of modernity — a notable exception being the well-worn paths — I can’t help thinking that this a timeless view

    With the cloud hiding most signs of modernity — a notable exception being the well-worn paths — I can’t help thinking that this a timeless view

    It is certainly a view the young James Cook would have recognised while he lived with his family at Aireyholme Farm. Cook of course would go on to achieve fame with his navigational exploits in the Pacific, beginning with his trip to Tahiti to observe of the Transit of Venus. He left England aboard the […]

  • Baysdale

    Baysdale

    Today is Australia Day. An Australian national holiday to commemorate when the British First Fleet, led by Captain Arthur Phillip, sailed into Port Jackson so establishing the first permanent white European settlement on the continent. The year was 1788, almost eighteen years after Captain James Cook had set foot on the place. The fleet comprised eleven […]

  • Aireyholme Farm

    Aireyholme Farm

    They must be lambing around now at Aireyholme Farm, the 1st April being the traditional date. There are plenty of sheep in the surrounding fields. Although a single farm now, Aireyholme was recorded in the Domesday Book as the manor of Ergun. It must have a been a moderately sized settlement then and the name […]

  • Capt. Cook’s Monument

    Capt. Cook’s Monument

    A cracking day on the moors. Breaking virgin snow on Easby Moor, totally on my own, the first time since this pandemic struck. Capt. Cook’s Monument has been an attraction ever since it was built. One such visitor was William Stott Banks, a Victorian gentleman. In 1866, he published a guide book of Walks in […]

  • What shall we do about Capt. Cook?

    What shall we do about Capt. Cook?

    The recent events in Bristol when Edward Colston, deputy governor of the Royal African Company which oversaw the transportation into slavery of an estimated 84,000 Africans plus another 19,000 who did not survive the sea voyage, ended up at the bottom of the harbour, raises questions closer to home. Whilst not condoning the criminal aspects […]

  • 14th February 1779 – Death of Capt. Cook in Kealakekua Bay, Hawaii

    14th February 1779 – Death of Capt. Cook in Kealakekua Bay, Hawaii

    I can not let St. Valentine’s Day pass without a mention of Captain James Cook R.N., Great Ayton’s most famous son, who was killed on this day in 1779 in Kealakekua Bay, Hawai’i. He is remembered as a hero, a great explorer, navigator, cartographer, “discoverer” of New Zealand. Ayton was his boyhood home, his father […]

  • Capt. Cook’s Monument

    Capt. Cook’s Monument

    A hostile environment of supercooled ice crystals, 20º below freezing. And 20,000′ below those cirrus clouds, it’s the hottest day of the year. Capt. Cook’s Monument, the obelisk on Easby Moor, that’s visible for miles around, towers above a group of schoolchildren enjoying being outside. It’s great to see some schools still value outdoor education. […]

  • Easby Moor

    Easby Moor

    It’s that mellow time of the year with every other field growing rapeseed. Used for animal feeds, vegetable oil and biodiesel. Easby Moor in the distance with Captain Cook’s monument. Open Space Web-Map builder Code