Out & About …

… on the North York Moors, or wherever I happen to be.

Month: October 2020

  • The Hunter’s Blue Moon

    The Hunter’s Blue Moon

    Well, I just had to post this. I won’t get another chance for two decades. The second full moon of the month, so it’s a blue moon, it’s October so it’s a Hunter’s Moon and it’s Halloween. The last time these three lunar phenomena coincided was 1944. So a rare occurrence indeed. And it’s a…

  • A bullfinch sky over Roseberry

    A bullfinch sky over Roseberry

    Perhaps not the best of sunsets but the crepuscule has always been a magical time. Throughout the millennia, man must have gazed upon the mesmerizing sky, reflecting on the day gone and the morrow to come. In Norfolk, a red-hued sunset was called a ‘bullfinch sky‘. I like that phrase but is it red enough…

  • Kalsarik√§nnit

    Kalsarikännit

    A Finnish word for that feeling you have when you spend the evening getting drunk at home alone in your underwear, with no intention of going out. The word came to me when this afternoon when I was so attired, log fire blazing away. The beer came later. I had returned home tired and weary…

  • Leven Falls

    Leven Falls

    In search of the “Leven Falls” somewhere downstream of Hutton Rudby. I recall reading of its existence in at least one guide book to Cleveland. Apparently, it was a popular Edwardian picnic spot. The falls are located just a few hundred metres downstream from Foxton Bridge, a crossing of the Leven which I have done…

  • Lonsdale

    Lonsdale

    I had a vague plan to run around the head of Lonsdale to Percy Cross but surveying the dale from Lonsdale quarry I remembered that I used to often follow a route crossing the valley by keeping upside of the moor wall. Those were the days when I rarely stuck to paths. On the descent…

  • Old Meggison

    Old Meggison

    I’ve heard that some new fencing has been erected at Old Meggison on the River Leven. So that was a good enough excuse for me to head over to Kildale Woods for a wander. Old Meggison is a lovely waterfall, accessed by a “Concessionary Footpath” which is awaiting the confirmation of an order to upgrade…

  • A changing pastoral scene

    A changing pastoral scene

    We are all familiar with flocks of sheep grazing on the hills and moors. They were first introduced by the Romans and we are now by far the largest sheep and lamb producer in the EU with a quarter of the total flock. We have 14 million breeding ewes here in the UK which last…

  • Staithes and Cowbar Nab

    Staithes and Cowbar Nab

    A view east from Boulby Bank. The sea looks quite benign from this height but beyond the lee of the cliffs the westerly winds were whipping up the white horses. It was much worse on this day in 1885, 135 years ago, when the North Sea coast was battered by a severe storm. Whitby, just…

  • Burton Howe

    Burton Howe

    The largest of four tumuli on a low knoll on the long ridge of Ingleby Moor. The other three are 60m to the north. It’s tempting to assume the name derives from the Old Norse ‚ÄėBotn‚Äô meaning a hollow, as does the name of the hamlet of Greenhow Botton which it overlooks. Burton Howe is…

  • Stanch Bullen and Round Hill

    Stanch Bullen and Round Hill

    I’ve always thought this was Fairy Cross Plain but that is not strictly correct. That name belongs to the col just off to the right, where Little Fryup Dale becomes Great Fryup Dale, where the myth persisted through the centuries as the home of elves and fairies. The small rounded knoll has a more descriptive…