Grime Moor

On rather dull overcast day with the National Trust on their Bridestones property. Quite a windy day and, for a fleeting moment, the sun came out.

To the west of the small secluded valley Dovedale Griff,  which was once known locally as the ‘Doodle1Brown, Alfred J. “Fair North Riding”. Page 116. Country Life Limited. 1952., is what remains of Grime Moor. The effect of the ploughing and ‘improving’ that occurred in the 70s can be seen in the distance.

It is thought by some that the name Grime is a corruption of Graeme, who was supposedly a local landowner2“LOCKTON and HIGH BRIDESTONES Circular walk from Lockton Cemetery”. Lockton & Levisham Heritage Group. Version 2. May 2008., but another source suggests it derives from an Old Scandinavian personal name Grímr, Grímir, Grímnir, or Grímólfr3“The Place-Names of the North Riding of Yorkshire” (1979). A. H. Smith. Volume V. Page 322. Cited by Ramsdale.org. (2014). North Yorkshire Littoral: Old Norse Place Names. [online] Available at: http://www.ramsdale.org/oldnorse.html#_ftn5 [Accessed 14 Oct. 2021]..

  • 1
    Brown, Alfred J. “Fair North Riding”. Page 116. Country Life Limited. 1952.
  • 2
    “LOCKTON and HIGH BRIDESTONES Circular walk from Lockton Cemetery”. Lockton & Levisham Heritage Group. Version 2. May 2008.
  • 3
    “The Place-Names of the North Riding of Yorkshire” (1979). A. H. Smith. Volume V. Page 322. Cited by Ramsdale.org. (2014). North Yorkshire Littoral: Old Norse Place Names. [online] Available at: http://www.ramsdale.org/oldnorse.html#_ftn5 [Accessed 14 Oct. 2021].

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *