Lordstones Country Park from Cringley End, the north-west nose of Cringle Moor

This privately owned park occupies the long flat col between Cringle Moor and Carlton Moor. Development began in 1986 with a “car park with public toilet and refreshment facilities together with accommodation for agricultural equipment”1Northyorkmoors.org.uk. (2021). Online Standard Details. [online] Available at: http://planning.northyorkmoors.org.uk/Northgate/PlanningExplorer/Generic/StdDetails.aspx?PT=Constraints&TYPE=PL/PlanningPK.xml&PARAM0=%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20786363&XSLT=/Northgate/PlanningExplorer/SiteFiles/Skins/NorthYorkMoors/xslt/PL/PLDetails.xslt&FT=Planning%20Details&DAURI=PLANNING&XMLSIDE=%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20%20/Northgate/PlanningExplorer/SiteFiles/Skins/NorthYorkMoors/Menus/PL.xml [Accessed 26 Jul. 2021]..  I remember it being highly controversial at the time but was mitigated by the café being discretely hidden under a grassed roof. It became a very popular place amongst the walking/running/cycling communities and came into its own in 2001 during the foot-and-mouth outbreak, being the only countryside open. Since then the property has undergone new ownership and extensive development creep.

Lias rocks can be seen exposed in the precipitous ravine of Tom Gill which outflows from Mourie’s Pond, a modern water feature dating from the 1990s along with the forestry which now completely smothers it.

The highest point on the col is Green Bank although this name is commonly given to the steep escarpment. Strictly, it is Busby Moor, originally part of the Busby estate of the Marwoods.

Busby Hall, out of sight and hidden by the trees on the right, has been the seat of the Marwood family since 15872Wikipedia Contributors (2020). Busby Hall. [online] Wikipedia. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Busby_Hall [Accessed 26 Jul. 2021].. The family is descended from Sir George Marwood, who was created a baronet by Charles II.3‘Sir William Marwood’ (1935) Times, 15 Apr, 16, available: https://link-gale-com.ezproxy.is.ed.ac.uk/apps/doc/CS269036687/GDCS?u=ed_itw&sid=bookmark-GDCS&xid=9132104c [accessed 26 Jul 2021]. although the family had held land for several centuries before that.

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