Bransdale Mill

Volunteering with the National Trust in Bransdale, planting 350 wildflower ‘plugs’. I must qualify that: I didn’t do all that number alone, it was a collective effort.

But an opportunity to post another photo of the mill, from the rear, the north aspect clearly showing the water race funnel into the building where the water wheel was located (actually it’s still there but in a pretty dilapidated state). This narrow section of the higher building dates from the 18th-century. The rest of this building was substantially modified in 1842. The arched opening next to the race was for the drive belt to an external grindstone.

The building to the left, with the slate roof, and that perpendicular to it (the gable is just visible – this was the miller’s cottage) also date from the 18th-century.

The smallest building, extreme left, date from 1817/8 extensions, while the single story slate roofed structure nearest the camera was added between 1821-54 and was the dairy.

Finally, the building extreme right, the roof partially hidden by the tree was an extension to the mill and dates from 1817/8.

My source for this information is a booklet “’The Mill at the World’s End’. Bransdale Mill. ‌Information for Volunteers. The National Trust.” This was available in the mill when it was a hostel. It is now a holiday let, but I assume the booklet is still there.

The booklet also provides a translation for the inscription on the porch:

In Hebrew: Proverbs Ch.I, v.7.
`the fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom’

In Greek: Thessalonians Ch5. vv.16 and 17.
‘Always rejoice, pray without ceasing,
In everything give thanks.’

In Latin:
‘This plaque was set up by me Emmanuel Strickland B.A. King’s College Cambridge and vicar of Ingleby Greenhow, Cleveland 1837.’

Previous posts: see here for the front view of the mill and here for an internal view of the millstone.

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