Out & About …

… on the North York Moors, or wherever I happen to be.

Category: Great Ayton

  • A view along the Cleveland Dyke

    A view along the Cleveland Dyke

    A view looking down on Gribdale Terrace, a row of white cottages built to accommodate the quarrymen employed at the adjacent whinstone mine and quarry. The line of the Whinstone or Cleveland Dyke can clearly be seen in the photograph, stretching from Cliff Rigg in the distance to behind the cottages where it follows the…

  • The Charnel House of All Saints Church

    The Charnel House of All Saints Church

    What a gloomy morning it was, with the moors blanketed in clag. However, as the afternoon arrived, so did the sun, and I popped down to the village’s All Saints church to photograph its alleged charnel house. I’ve posted about this remarkable church before, it proudly stands as the oldest structure in Great Ayton. The…

  • Ayton Bank — and a delve into the world of ‘Tumblers’

    Ayton Bank — and a delve into the world of ‘Tumblers’

    This morning, I was lucky enough to get dropped off in Guisborough, and decided to walk back home, a one-way trip; avoiding, of course, the more popular paths since it’s a Sunday. Ayton Bank is off the beaten track that offers a quiet location. In the distance is Easby Moor, topped with Capt. Cook’s Monument.…

  • The Rose of Rosebery

    The Rose of Rosebery

    In this delightful piece written back in 1900, Richard Blakeborough recounts the peculiar practice of ‘Standing the Church.’ Now, this particular punishment bears an uncanny resemblance to the tradition of ‘Charivari,’ ‘Rough Music,’ or, as Northerners called it, ‘Riding the Stang.’ Since the late 17th century, the terms have commonly been employed to describe a…

  • The Rise and Fall of Alum Production in Great Ayton

    The Rise and Fall of Alum Production in Great Ayton

    As I descend from Capt. Cook’s Monument, approaching Gribdale Terrace, the former whinstone quarrymen’s cottages gleam white, with Cliff Rigg rising behind them. Before me, in the centre of the photo is a range of sandstone buildings mapped as Bank House Farm on the 1853 OS Six-inch map, but an auction advertisement in the Yorkshire…

  • Through Mist and Mud

    Through Mist and Mud

    Amidst the bleakness of a dreary day near the old site of Summerhill Farm, stand these lichen covered gate posts, a testament to times long gone. The muddy path between them is now only trod by sheep, and the ruinous dry stone wall adds to the sense of abandonment. Yet, in the midst of it…

  • Andrew Carter: A Story of Canny Yatton 270 Years Ago

    Andrew Carter: A Story of Canny Yatton 270 Years Ago

    Another story from the works of Richard Blakeborough set in Canny Yatton, the local name for Great Ayton. Blakeborough wrote this account in 1902, stating that the event took place approximately 150 years prior, in 1752. At that time, James Cook, the most well-known resident of Great Ayton, was just 24 years old and had…

  • Winter’s last stand?

    Winter’s last stand?

    The brief return to Winter didn’t last long, but the last stubborn snow patches are hanging on for dear life on the fields of Aireyholme. But Roseberry Topping’s sandstone cap is clear, anxious to let go of winter fashion. Ah, Roseberry Topping, the hill that thinks it’s a volcano. With its unique shape, it’s the…

  • River Leven

    River Leven

    A paddling of ducks in Ayton can be seen swimming leisurely on the River Leven, located downstream of a weir, which is referred to locally as the waterfall. Despite the serene ambiance, there are several concerns about the condition of the river. Agricultural lands located upstream contribute to high levels of nitrates and sediment runoff.…

  • An echo of the past silenced as hawthorn trees are felled — a loss for nature and history

    An echo of the past silenced as hawthorn trees are felled — a loss for nature and history

    Three years ago I lamented on the felling of a patch of semi-open woodland on the southern flank of Roseberry Topping. It was a parcel of scattered trees, mostly Hawthorn, the felling of which was a significant loss, not only in terms of its wild beauty but also its ecological importance. Hawthorn trees provide food,…