Out & About …

… on the North York Moors, or wherever I happen to be.

Tag: 19th-century

  • From a Scenic View to Deadly Plots: The Cato Street Conspiracy

    From a Scenic View to Deadly Plots: The Cato Street Conspiracy

    On the parish boundary between Easby and Kildale, looking through the self-seeded birch wood toward Ward Nab, a sandstone outcrop the origin of which name escapes my grasp. Therefore, I must lean on hodiurnal past happenings for the rest of this post. In the tumultuous throes of economic strife and political unrest in the early…

  • Connections: A Hidden Iron Age Gem to Trevelyan’s Controversial Past

    Connections: A Hidden Iron Age Gem to Trevelyan’s Controversial Past

    According to the National Trust’s heritage records, this conspicuous feature is termed a “small univallate earthwork.” ‘Univallate’ is just a fancy way of saying it’s got one raised edge encircling a ditch. Usually, that word is usually associated with hillforts, but here, the lack of any visible signs of habitation inside points more towards a…

  • A winter’s view from Yoad House

    A winter’s view from Yoad House

    The view from the garden of Yoad House in Bransdale, where the emergence of snowdrops signals the impending arrival of spring. The tranquillity of the snow-clad fields extending down to the beck is lost in the mist veiling the opposite bank, and by the stark silhouettes of skeletal trees and precarious dry-stone walls, lend a…

  • Easby Hall and the Rise and Fall of the Whitby Campions

    Easby Hall and the Rise and Fall of the Whitby Campions

    The tiny hamlet of Easby serves as a picturesque setting against the majestic backdrop of the Cleveland Hills. The large prominent house to the left of centre is Easby Hall. Easby Manor came into the possession of Robert Campion, a prominent figure in Whitby during the early 19th century. Campion, a banker and businessman of…

  • Clitherbecks — Coal, Cottages and Calamity

    Clitherbecks — Coal, Cottages and Calamity

    Clitherbecks, a very lonely and remote place on the moors near Danby, yet attaining a certain picturesque quality beneath the blanket of snow. The dale is renowned for its coal mining legacy. Modest, isolated shafts were operated using a ‘horse gin.’ Upon reaching the seam, horizontal headings were dug in various directions until deemed too…

  • Barbed Wire’s Impact on Land, Livestock, and Liberty

    Barbed Wire’s Impact on Land, Livestock, and Liberty

    In 2003, the heavy metal band Iron Maiden released their album, Dance of Death, which including the epic ‘Paschendale’ [sic]: Whistles, shouts and more gun fire Lifeless bodies hang on barbed wire Battlefield nothing but a bloody tomb Be reunited with my dead friends soon Many soldiers eighteen year Drown in mud, no more tears…

  • Yat stoops on Easby Bank

    Yat stoops on Easby Bank

    On a morning with ever-changing atmospheric conditions, I found myself in pursuit of that elusive sun. The weather played tricks, switching between drizzle and dullness one moment, and dazzling sunlight accompanied by rainbows the next. Thus, an opportunistic approach in selecting a photograph for today’s posting. This pair of ‘yat stoops‘ located on Easby Bank…

  • Scarth Wood Moor

    Scarth Wood Moor

    I’ve previously posted how Major Herbert Peake, of Bawtry Hall in Doncaster, gifted the 220 acres or so of Scarth Wood Moor upon the National Trust back in 1935. Peake has an interesting history. Born in 1859 to Henry Peake of Westholme in Lincolnshire, he wouldn’t have been exactly raised in the humblest of surroundings.…

  • 1874’s Graffiti: Dogs, a Fox, or a Pig on Broughton Bank

    1874’s Graffiti: Dogs, a Fox, or a Pig on Broughton Bank

    Today, I stumbled upon some Victorian graffiti – or should I say graffito? It depicts a duo of dogs, or perhaps a dog hot on the heels of a fox, or maybe even a pig in pursuit of a dog. The artistic merit of the second canine is up for debate. Dated with 1874, this…

  • Storm Babet’s Legacy: The disappointing remains of the Esk

    Storm Babet’s Legacy: The disappointing remains of the Esk

    One of my particular aversions is walking, or running, along a beach, a seemingly endless repetition, a far-off point on the horizon never drawing closer. Yet, it was deemed worthwhile to undertake this stomp in order to see the substantial remains of a wooden sailing vessel cast ashore in the aftermath of Storm Babet. The…