Out & About …

… on the North York Moors, or wherever I happen to be.

Tag: National Trust

  • Priest’s Spa Quarry and its elusive spring

    Priest’s Spa Quarry and its elusive spring

    On Hither Moor, this 19th century sandstone quarry overlooks the road winding up the Cod Beck dale between Osmotherley and Scarth Nick. Nowadays, the dale is best known for its reservoir that draws quite the crowd. The quarry, mapped as “Priests’ Spa” by the early Ordnance Survey, owes its name to a spring allegedly blessed…

  • Life finds a way

    Life finds a way

    Am I on an arboreal theme this week? A toppled tree trunk, adorned with vibrant green moss and saprophytic reddish-brown fungi. The presence of the latter suggests that the tree has been dead for some time. But is it truly lifeless? Fungi, the decomposers in this woodland ecosystem, toil away, breaking down deceased trees and…

  • Connections: A Hidden Iron Age Gem to Trevelyan’s Controversial Past

    Connections: A Hidden Iron Age Gem to Trevelyan’s Controversial Past

    According to the National Trust’s heritage records, this conspicuous feature is termed a “small univallate earthwork.” ‘Univallate’ is just a fancy way of saying it’s got one raised edge encircling a ditch. Usually, that word is usually associated with hillforts, but here, the lack of any visible signs of habitation inside points more towards a…

  • Cragside

    Cragside

    Exploring the National Trust’s Cragside near Rothbury. Lovely historic property, well maintained but a feeling of being corralled and cosseted — not an adventure.

  • Stang Stoops and Slip Gates

    Stang Stoops and Slip Gates

    Returning to Yoad House in Bransdale, the weather was a tad kinder this week, not as harsh as the last. The forecasted rain? Nowhere to be found. And, surprise, in the afternoon the sun decided to make an appearance. That stone post in the photo? It’s part of what is called a ‘stang stoop’ or…

  • Deep in Newton Wood—in search of Cold Well

    Deep in Newton Wood—in search of Cold Well

    On a rather damp morning, likely the dampest of this winter, I seized the opportunity to explore something that has lingered in my thoughts for quite some time. Attempting to do so last summer proved futile due to the impenetrable undergrowth. Within Newton Wood lies a feature labelled as “Cold Well” on the 1st edition…

  • Ormesby Hall—from family home to National Trust property

    Ormesby Hall—from family home to National Trust property

    Perched proudly on the outskirts of a bustling housing estate, Ormesby Hall, a Palladian mansion, appears somewhat incongruous. Despite its seemingly out-of-place location, it maintains an air of refinement and is surrounded by parkland, a sharp contrast with its urban surroundings. In contrast to more opulent residences like Marton and Gunnergate Halls, erected with newfound…

  • The Price of Popularity—When stunning views become exploited gems

    The Price of Popularity—When stunning views become exploited gems

    I tend to avoid Roseberry summit on weekends. It’s bustling up there, not my cup of tea. I crave the sweet solitude of the hills. But these days, being out in the countryside is like the coolest thing to do. Blame it on the pandemic or whatever, but it’s not like the old days. Ah,…

  • Cockle Scar — where is the Cat Trod?

    Cockle Scar — where is the Cat Trod?

    Best viewed on the approach from the direction of Guisborough, Roseberry Topping boasts a conspicuous shelf around the 200-metre mark called Cockle Scar. Like a tiered cake, it is the top edge of the sandstone stratum recognised by geologists as the Staithes Formation. In his memoirs, ‘Half a Century of Sport,’ Sir Alfred Pease, a member…

  • Looking down on the folly and a marcescent oak

    Looking down on the folly and a marcescent oak

    A disappointing coverage of snow. A mere smattering. I reckon we had slightly more down in the village, but the Cleveland Hills in the distance appear proper snow-clad. This delightful early morning view is looking down on the folly from the western side of Roseberry. An oak sapling, stubbornly holding onto its dried leaves, occupies…