Out & About …

… on the North York Moors, or wherever I happen to be.

Tag: folklore

  • Concerning the ghost of a man of Ayton in Cleveland

    Concerning the ghost of a man of Ayton in Cleveland

    I’ve been saving this little story up hoping to come across a suitable image to accompany it. It came back to me today, and finding inspiration, I have given up waiting. But first, the featured image is, of course, of Roseberry Topping, “t’ biggest hill i’ all Yorkshur” that overlooks the village of Great Ayton.…

  • Today is Tharcake Monday

    Today is Tharcake Monday

    In the Northern counties, the first Monday after Halloween is Tharcake Monday. Lancashire seems to have claimed the monopoly for this cake which originally made of unfermented dough — chiefly meals of rye, barley and pea, mixed with milk or water— rolled very thin, and baked hard in the oven. But the tradition is also…

  • The Farndale Hob

    The Farndale Hob

    I realised the other day that I don’t know upper Farndale at all. I’ve skirted around the skyline on the Rudland Rigg or the track of the old mineral railway to Rosedale many, many times. I do remember crossing the dale once in the Cleveland Survival Race. But I can’t say I’ve ever been to…

  • Danby Botton

    Danby Botton

    Danby Dale’s middle section is termed ‘Danby Botton’, where Botton comes  from an Old Scandinavian word ‘Botn’ for a hollow. The farm nearest is Stormy Hall which is the centre of a tradition dating from the time that Danby Castle was in the possession of the Latimers. Apparently, the hall takes its name from the fact…

  • The Wicked Squire of Basedale

    The Wicked Squire of Basedale

    A photo of Baysdale to accompany this story I came across by Richard Blakeborough in the Northern Weekly Gazette from 1912 It’s a cracking story, which I fear would be diminshed if I attempted to trim it down. I am therefore repeating it in full which makes this my longest post ever (which I’ve split…

  • Jenny Bradley stone

    Jenny Bradley stone

    My mind was piqued by the following sentence in a 1906 article in the Whitby Gazette by that prolific writer on all North Yorkshire matters, John Fairfax-Blakeborough (1883-1976): A mile or so from the Nab is to be seen, by the side of the road, a stone which, to the traveller unversed in local legend,…

  • Ladhill Gill

    Ladhill Gill

    Ladhill Beck separates the parish of Hawnby from Bilsdale Westside. The upper reaches have a desolate feel with forlorn farmsteads: Honey Hill, Sike House, Low and High Twaites, Hazelshaw House, Sod Hall, Weather House, and Bumper Castle. That’s Bumper Castle in the photo, right of centre. It seems to have grown more forlorn since the…

  • Roseberry Summit

    Roseberry Summit

    A rather unusual view of the summit crag, the result of playing with a GoPro on a selfie-stick. The rock face is not as vertical as I remember but that may be due to an optical illusion due to the wide angle lens. The sandstone crag looks good but is considered unstable by the climbing fraternity.…

  • Roseberry Well

    Roseberry Well

    I moved up to the Cleveland area in the Autumn of 1973 and I’ve been climbing Roseberry on a regular basis every since. It’s my patch. And I thought I knew every nook and cranny. I knew about Roseberry Well, where the young Prince Oswy is said to have drowned having been taken to the…

  • Highcliff Nab

    Highcliff Nab

    Recent felling has opened up a new view of Highcliff Nab, a bluff overlooking Guisborough. One myth once told by Guisborough folk is that Oliver Cromwell had cannons planted on the Nab, from which he bombarded Guisborough Priory, causing its demolition. Three old cannon balls were apparently found embedded in the stone wall of the…