Wainstones

Seen from Cold Moor, across Garfit gap. The morning’s duvet just about blown off, and the December sunshine hitting the crags for the first time.

The Wainstones are a popular climbing venue. It’s difficult to get any idea of scale with this shot. The maximum climb is about 35′, just over twice the size of a double deckers bus.

The earliest recorded climb was in 1906, by E.E. Roberts, although as he himself wrote “odd visits don’t count, some idle shepherd boy may have climbed here before me1Simcock, Peter. “Rock Climbs on the North York Moors”. 4th Edition. 1985. Cleveland Mountaineering Club..

Other climbers soon followed, notably brothers C.E. and D Burrow, and York based E. and G. Ceighton, cycling in, a round trip of 80 miles. E. Creighton was particularly committed, patrolling the rocks during the night during WW1 armed with a revolver “looking for Zeppelins2Ibid..

Between the wars, there was a spate of enthusiasm between 1928 and 1932, when a group of Teesside climbers known as ‘The Bergers’ established many of today’s standard routes3Ibid..

  • 1
    Simcock, Peter. “Rock Climbs on the North York Moors”. 4th Edition. 1985. Cleveland Mountaineering Club.
  • 2
    Ibid.
  • 3
    Ibid.

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